EDITORIAL

Elizabeth Warren – A Presidential Candidate In Waiting?

Photo Credit: Tim Pierce - Elizabeth Warren at a campaign rally in Auburn, Massachusetts, Nov 2, 2012.  Source -https://www.flickr.com/photos/qwrrty/8152000438/
Photo Credit: Tim Pierce – Elizabeth Warren at a campaign rally in Auburn, Massachusetts, Nov 2, 2012. Source -https://www.flickr.com/photos/qwrrty/8152000438/

“Politics is the art of the possible, the attainable – the art of the next best” -Otto von Bismarck

Political pundits and analysts are already having a field day in pontificating on whom they think are the likely candidates to not only run for the presidential election in 2016, but also the most likely person to win the election.

Granted its early days yet, but in order not to be left behind, a number of politicians are already jostling to stay in the spotlight and position themselves as frontrunners in a race that is already shaping up to be crowded as well as long and brutal.

Whereas four members of the Republican Party have already openly declared themselves candidates for the 2016 race and more than ten posturing by showing some interest, it’s not so clear cut on the Democratic side as everyone is eyeballing former U.S. Secretary of State, Hilary Clinton, to see whether she will make her second bid for the White House.

However, should Hilary expressed no further interest in running for the White House, yet alone politics, the Democrats rallying cry could very well be run Elizabeth, run!

Elizabeth Ann Warren is a former Harvard Law School professor and a first term and highly rated senator from Massachusetts.

She does not only have the academic pedigree and political nous but also understands the nuances of government.

Warren has been often chastised in the press by her critics, primarily the Republicans for being a socialist. In a recent interview on CBS’ Face the Nation, the host had the following exchange with her:

“Your fans say you’re a populist, but your critics say you’re basically a socialist,” said host Bob Schieffer.

“I just don’t know where they get that,” Warren replied. “You know, look at the issues. I mean really, let’s take a look at minimum wage — I just believe nobody should work full time and live in poverty. And you know what? Most of America agrees. Student loans: I don’t think the U.S. government should be making tens of billions of dollars in profits off the backs of our students, which is what the current student loan system is doing. And I think most Americans agree with me on that.”

Warren is no push over, but has spunk and an air of gravitas that commands respect from both her colleagues and constituents. She encountered strong opposition from business interests in her senate race and was described as a threat to free enterprise by Rob Engstrom, political director for the United States Chamber of Commerce.

She has positioned herself as a champion and voice of the beleaguered middle class or the so called “99%” – a group who feel like the system is rigged against them, and those whom think they got shafted, even though played by the rules.

That said, Senator Warren is the recipient of many rewards including being named one of Time Magazine 100 Most influential People in the World in 2009 and 2010, and repeatedly named by theNational Law Journal as one of the Fifty most Influential Women Attorneys in America. She also in 2009 became the first professor in Harvard’s history to win the law schools – The Sacks-Freund Teaching Award twice.

The fact is not many politicians boast the credentials of a Elizabeth Warren nor display her work ethics, therefore a presidential run for her should not be far fetched.

Notwithstanding, she has openly declared her position not to compete for the White House at this time, but who knows, politics is not an exact science and the arithmetic can be easily changed, in other words, any card can play, no?

Yvad Billings, Readers Bureau, Fellow