FOOD/HEALTH

Multiple Sclerosis

According to mayoclinic.org, Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease in which one’s immune system attacks the protective sheath (myelin) that covers the nerves. Myelin damage disrupts communication between one’s brain and the rest of one’s body. Ultimately, the nerves themselves may deteriorate a process that’s currently irreversible.

The signs and symptoms of MS vary widely, depending on the amount of damage and which nerves are affected.

There’s no cure for multiple sclerosis. However, treatments can help speed recovery from attacks, modify the course of the disease and manage symptoms.

Main Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis and damanged Myelin.
Main Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis and damanged Myelin.

The site list MS signs and symptoms as:

  • Numbness or weakness in one or more limbs that typically occurs on one side of your body at a time, or the legs and trunk
  • Partial or complete loss of vision, usually in one eye at a time, often with pain during eye movement
  • Double vision or blurring of vision
  • Tingling or pain in parts of your body
  • Electric-shock sensations that occur with certain neck movements, especially bending the neck forward
  • Tremor, lack of coordination or unsteady gait
  • Slurred speech
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Problems with bowel and bladder function

Disease course

Most people with MS have a relapsing-remitting course, with new symptoms (relapse) that develop over days or weeks and usually improve partially or completely, followed by a quiet period (remission) that can last months or even years. Small increases in body temperature can temporarily worsen signs and symptoms of MS, but that type of event isn’t a relapse.

About 60 to 70 percent of people with relapsing-remitting MS eventually develop a steady progression of symptoms, with or without periods of remission (secondary-progressive MS). The worsening symptoms usually include problems with gait. The rate of progression varies greatly among people with secondary-progressive MS.

Some people with MS experience a gradual onset and steady progression of signs and symptoms with no relapses (primary-progressive MS).

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